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December 01, 2015

A newly released study by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) stresses the need for continuous support to HIV-positive people under antiretroviral therapy (ART), including at hospital level.

July 20, 2015

The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) warned today that not enough is being done to ensure that people with HIV/AIDS who are on antiretroviral treatment (ART) reach and maintain “undetectable” levels of virus in their blood.

March 03, 2015

In Brussels earlier today, the European Commission hosted an international conference on the subject of the ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa. With the one-year anniversary of the outbreak approaching, the purpose of the conference is to discuss ways to accelerate the process of eliminating the disease in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, and to make plans for the post-outbreak recovery needs in these countries.

July 18, 2014

From July 20 to 25, the international community will gather at the International AIDS conference in Melbourne, Australia, in order to explore strategies to beat the greatest pandemic of our times. HIV still kills 1.6 million people every year, most of them in poor countries of sub-Saharan Africa. In order to bring life-saving antiretroviral treatment (ART) to the nearly 16 million who still need it worldwide, it is crucial to alleviate one of the main barriers preventing them from accessing care: distance to the health centres where they can get these drugs.

In December 2007 MSF began providing essential healthcare to Zimbabwean migrants in the South African border town of Musina and in central Johannesburg. It is estimated that there are more than one million Zimbabwean migrants in South Africa.

MSF reacts to cholera outbreak in Harare

“I am feeling a little uncomfortable,” says Henry, quietly. He's a middle-aged gentleman politely looking up at Clara Chamizo from where he is lying on the dirty floor. Henry is so dehydrated his cheeks are completely sucked in and his eyes stand out in his skull. Chamizo, a nurse with the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)  project in Beitbridge, Zimbabwe, sees the absurdity of this statement. She stands in the middle of tens of cholera patients, on the dirt in the backyard of the main hospital. Cholera has overwhelmed this border town of about 40,000 like wildfire.

More than 11,000 patients seen by MSF

Zimbabwe's humanitarian crisis continues to rapidly deteriorate, causing appalling suffering, warns Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). The organization’s medical teams have now treated almost 45,000 people, an estimated 75 per cent of the total number of cases in the current cholera outbreak — and the crisis is far from over.

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