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July 31, 2017

Sick and injured civilians within and outside Raqqa city are facing major difficulties obtaining urgent lifesaving medical care due to the ongoing battle to control the northeastern Syrian city, says international medical organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).

June 09, 2017

As fighting intensifies for control of the Syrian city of Raqqa, people fleeing the city and surrounding villages must decide whether to stay put under heavy bombardment, or leave the city by crossing active frontlines and minefields, says international medical organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).

May 03, 2017

During the afternoon of April 29, Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) makeshift hospitals were subject to outrageous breaches of respect as intense fighting erupted between armed opposition groups in the besieged Syrian city of Damascus, in the suburbs of East Ghouta. As an "in-extremis" measure to underscore that such attacks on healthcare will not be tolerated by MSF, nor by the medics MSF supports. MSF will suspend its medical support to the East Ghouta region until there are clear signs that the fighting parties will respect healthcare.

April 05, 2017

A Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) medical team providing support to the emergency department of Bab Al Hawa hospital, in Syria’s Idlib province, has confirmed that patients’ symptoms are consistent with exposure to a neurotoxic agent such as sarin gas.

March 31, 2017

A hospital in northern Syria supported by international medical organisation Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been hit in an aerial attack.

At around 6 pm on March 25, Latamneh hospital in northern Hama governorate was targeted by a bomb dropped by a helicopter, which hit the entrance of the building. Information collected by the hospital medical staff suggests that chemical weapons were used.

March 03, 2017

Témoignage, or bearing witness, is described in MSF’s official statement of principles as something vital to our identity — to be “done with the intention of improving the situation for populations in danger.” But témoignage also comes with an obligation to raise public awareness about what we see, including openly criticizing and denouncing any violations of international humanitarian law that contribute to the suffering we are confronted with in our medical work.

February 15, 2017

Close to one hundred medical facilities belonging to or supported by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) have been bombed since 2015. The vast majority have been in Syria, the others were in Yemen, Afghanistan, Ukraine and Sudan. MSF considers it vital to establish the facts and ascertain who was responsible for each of the bombings so that it can continue, with at least some assurance that civilian facilities will be protected, to provide assistance while demanding justice and reparation. But how can the perpetrators be taken to task when they deny, contest or minimize their responsibility and describe their attacks as simple errors?

January 12, 2017

Every year, hundreds of Canadians work overseas with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), delivering front-line medical care as part of MSF’s lifesaving emergency programs. We aim to introduce you to some of them, such as Trish Newport, a longtime project coordinator who recently returned from working with Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

December 13, 2016

As the battle for Aleppo in Syria reaches its most critical point, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is outraged at the violence directed against civilians and the passivity displayed by all those that can do something to stop it. MSF calls on all warring parties to abide by their obligation to protect civilians in both the besieged areas and in areas newly taken over by the Syrian government.

November 28, 2016

Despite the extent of the crisis and people's needs, MSF is significantly constrained in its presence and medical activities in Syria, mainly due to insecurity but also due to a lack of agreements and authorizations. These constraints are as present today as they were a year and a half ago. To this date, the Syrian government has not granted us authorization to work in the country. MSF nevertheless continues to directly operate six health facilities in the north of Syria, and puts significant energy into providing the best possible support to more than 150 health facilities countrywide, in areas where MSF cannot be directly present. MSF teams also work in the countries neighbouring Syria, providing assistance to refugees and host communities.

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