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January 12, 2017

Every year, hundreds of Canadians work overseas with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), delivering front-line medical care as part of MSF’s lifesaving emergency programs. We aim to introduce you to some of them, such as Trish Newport, a longtime project coordinator who recently returned from working with Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

August 05, 2016

On Dr. Rogy Masri’s last day in Lebanon, staff in four Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) clinics in Tripoli ate cakes that had been decorated with an edible photo of his smiling, bearded face to bid him farewell — a testimony to the Toronto-based physician’s popularity with local colleagues. “They knew I have a really sweet tooth,” Dr. Masri chuckles. “I ate a lot of cake during my six-month assignment.”

August 20, 2015

The last few weeks have brought unprecedented high temperatures to much of the Middle East. In Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley, home to at least 410,000 refugees, temperatures have reached as high as 42 degrees. The heat isn’t just bringing discomfort; it’s bringing sickness.

April 17, 2015

Over one million Syrians have sought to escape a brutal armed conflict in their home country by fleeing to Lebanon, often becoming impoverished in the process and living in crowded, makeshift shelters. Add trying to survive with diabetes to those circumstances, and the situation for many becomes tragic. James Elliott is a Canadian researcher who recently returned from Lebanon, where he worked with diabetes patients among the Syrian refugee population.

December 11, 2014

Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) teams travelling to evaluate the medical needs of the people affected by Typhoon Hagupit in Philippines have reached the areas most impacted by the storm, and have found that most communities were well prepared ahead of its arrival. Given the minor medical needs in the affected areas at this stage, and the involvement of the Philippines Department of Health, assessors concluded there is no need for an MSF medical intervention.

May 08, 2014
In the six months since Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines, teams from Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) have provided care for emergency and everyday health problems in hospitals and mobile clinics, delivered clean water and helped repair sewage systems and health centres in some of the worst affected areas. 
 
As the recovery effort has progressed, MSF has withdrawn from areas where its assistance is no longer needed, and stayed on in places where the health system has yet to recover. 
 
March 20, 2014

Cradled in his father’s arms, five-month-old Niño cries feebly. He is coughing and has been feverish for two days, with red spots on his face.

January 27, 2014

Over the past seven weeks, teams from Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) have run mobile clinics by boat to deliver medical and humanitarian aid to five small islands south of Guiuan that were affected by Typhoon Haiyan.

December 10, 2013

One month after Typhoon Haiyan swept through the central Philippines, Filipinos are starting to rebuild their homes and lives, said MSF emergency coordinator Ibrahim Younis. But while people in cities are receiving assistance, said Younis, many remote farming communities have still received little aid.

November 26, 2013

Despite increasing amounts of humanitarian aid reaching typhoon-hit areas of the Philippines, MSF teams are still finding villages and towns that have not yet received any aid.MSF’s teams are working in hospitals, running mobile clinics, providing mental healthcare, distributing essential relief items and clean drinking water.In Guiuan, Samar Island, MSF set up a 40-bed tent hospital, distributed 1,200 tents and is providing potable water to over 20,000 people. In the city of Tacloban, Leyte Island, MSF set up a 45-bed inflatable hospital.

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