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October 17, 2017

Iraqis are returning home in Mosul after years of violence to find their houses rigged with explosive devices and their cities uninhabitable, according to international medical organisation Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF). The destruction of buildings and infrastructure means that returning families, particularly in West Mosul, end up living in partially or totally ruined homes, with almost no access to clean water, electricity or medical care.

July 20, 2017

Teams from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) are scaling up assistance in anticipation of increasing humanitarian and medical needs in hard-to-reach areas of Borno state, Nigeria.

July 05, 2017

The emergency room has turned into a brutal testament to the horrors this battle has inflicted on residents. A little girl told a staff member how she watched her brother die right in front of her. The air is filled with the sound of sobbing, wailing, cries of pain and shock, and guttural exclamations of relief after finally escaping.

July 05, 2017

Extreme levels of conflict and violence in the besieged city of Mosul, Iraq — including airstrikes, bombardment, suicide attacks and gunshots — are taking a devastating toll on residents of the embattled Old City, says the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).

May 09, 2017

As of the end of April, a total of 9,646 suspected cases of meningitis have been reported with a total of 839 deaths across Nigeria since late 2016, according to the Ministry of Health. The outbreak was officially declared in February, 2017. Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has deployed 11 medical field teams across Sokoto, Zamfara, Yobe, Niger and Kebbi states of Nigeria to support the Ministry of Health in the management of the current meningitis outbreak.

May 04, 2017

Emergency trauma surgery is the beginning rather than the end of a long journey to recovery for those injured in Mosul, major city in northern Iraq. As such, Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is running a 40-bed hospital in Hamdaniya, a town south of Mosul, to cater for the needs of those recovering from surgery and attempting to rebuild their lives. MSF recovered the testimonies of eight patients and staff from MSF’s Hamdaniya facility:

May 04, 2017

Trapped in the middle of an ongoing political and complex civil war in Iraq, the battle for Mosul is escalating. People are being forced to flee their homes to live in harsh conditions and no basic medical care. To respond to these widespread medical needs, Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) continues to extend services for the benefit of war-wounded patients and people in need.

April 18, 2017

Violence and insecurity continue to force people from their homes in northeast Nigeria, where new waves of displaced are arriving in remote towns of Borno State. Nigerian refugees are also being forcibly returned from Cameroon, international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) said today.

April 18, 2017

At the end of 2016, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) started to offer primary healthcare and other services in Pulka, in the northeastern Nigerian state of Borno. Over the past few months, this small town situated next to the border with Cameroon has become a hotspot for new arrivals of people fleeing military operations by the Nigerian military and attacks by Boko Haram, and in search of food and basic services. Danca Paiva is MSF’s project coordinator in Pulka.

March 22, 2017

On the 19 of February, MSF opened a field trauma hospital with surgical capacity in a village south of Mosul. It is composed of two operating theatres, one intensive care unit, an emergency room, an in-patient ward and other necessary support facilities. The MSF team working within the hospital, composed primarily of Iraqi surgeons, doctors and nurses, only has the capacity to operate on the most severe life threatening cases, known as “red cases”; those that can wait are referred to hospitals further afield.

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