Previous
Next

Country/Region

August 17, 2015

In Tumaco, Nariño Department, Colombia, Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) has responded to an increase in Chikungunya, a viral disease that causes fever and severe joint pain and is transmitted to humans by infected mosquitoes.

July 09, 2015

Displacements, restrictions on mobility and lack of access to basic goods and services such as healthcare: These are the main consequences of the escalation of the conflict in southwestern Colombia, which is causing a growing humanitarian crisis.

By Simon Midgley. Uraba Project, Colombia

After months of work and negotiations with armed groups, MSF has managed to access the Bajo Atrato region in Choco, Colombia. During the week of November 5, an MSF mobile clinic visited several communities isolated by the conflict along the river corridor of Truando, south of Riosucio, the municipal capital. The team offered vaccinations for hundreds of children under five and medical attention for the general population.

“Many people leave for Florencia yet if even then they feel threatened, they flee to Bogotá or further away”, says Serge Le Duc, MSF coordinator who has just returned from Caquetá, Colombia.

“People sometimes look for someone to listen to them and other times to help them make a decision” - Interview with Dr. Alessandro Huber, MSF psychiatrist, who has worked for two years in Caquetá, Colombia

MSF program manager Filipe Ribero has conducted several evaluations at sites where displaced persons are living in Tbilisi and Gori.  In the field, there is a sharp contrast between a massive influx of international aid and limited opportunities — for now — to provide assistance. What is the current situation in Georgia?

Fighting has calmed in and around the breakaway region of South Ossetia, and the warring parties have reached a ceasefire agreement. The short, violent conflict has displaced a lot of people in Georgia, South Ossetia and the Northern Caucasus region of Russia. As of 20 August, MSF is still unable to access South Ossetia, the area where the conflict had broken out, in order to conduct an independent needs assessment and provide medical and humanitarian aid to the population if necessary.

An MSF emergency team based in Tbilisi has been able to gain access to the separatist province of South Ossetia and visit Tskhinvali Hospital. MSF, which already provides support to displaced people in Tbilisi, has offered to provide medical assistance in South Ossetia. On August 23 an MSF team was able to gain access to Tskhinvali in Southern Ossetia, visiting the republican hospital in this city where intense fighting broke out on August 7. The situation has been slowly returning to normal in the aftermath of the peace accord signed by Russia and Georgia.

Pages