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December 01, 2015

A newly released study by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) stresses the need for continuous support to HIV-positive people under antiretroviral therapy (ART), including at hospital level.

July 20, 2015

The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) warned today that not enough is being done to ensure that people with HIV/AIDS who are on antiretroviral treatment (ART) reach and maintain “undetectable” levels of virus in their blood.

July 18, 2014

From July 20 to 25, the international community will gather at the International AIDS conference in Melbourne, Australia, in order to explore strategies to beat the greatest pandemic of our times. HIV still kills 1.6 million people every year, most of them in poor countries of sub-Saharan Africa. In order to bring life-saving antiretroviral treatment (ART) to the nearly 16 million who still need it worldwide, it is crucial to alleviate one of the main barriers preventing them from accessing care: distance to the health centres where they can get these drugs.

An MSF team composed by six people arrived this morning at 5am local time in Pedang Indonesia. The team is composed of a doctor, two nurses, one psychologist and two logisticians. The MSF team arrived with five tons of medical supplies, non-food items and plastic sheeting. In the affected areas, MSF is the only international organisation present at the moment. Once arrived in Pedang, the team divided itself in three and they assessed the situation in four areas: Kota Padan Panjang, Kota Solok, Payakumbuh and Kota Bukittinggi.

Following the earthquakes that have hit Sumatra island, the emergency team of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Indonesia has started an evaluation of the damage and the medical needs among the population. A first team arrived in Padang and found the initial needs were covered well. "They report a quick response from the authorities," says Luc van Leemput, coordinator for the work of MSF in Indonesia.

Following the earthquakes that hit the Indonesian island of Sumatra on Sept. 12 and 13, MSF’s emergency team has distributed relief items and is continuing to further assess the needs. With strong aftershocks continuing to shake the region, psychosocial support to the survivors is one of the main priorities.

In December 2007 MSF began providing essential healthcare to Zimbabwean migrants in the South African border town of Musina and in central Johannesburg. It is estimated that there are more than one million Zimbabwean migrants in South Africa.

MSF reacts to cholera outbreak in Harare

“I am feeling a little uncomfortable,” says Henry, quietly. He's a middle-aged gentleman politely looking up at Clara Chamizo from where he is lying on the dirty floor. Henry is so dehydrated his cheeks are completely sucked in and his eyes stand out in his skull. Chamizo, a nurse with the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)  project in Beitbridge, Zimbabwe, sees the absurdity of this statement. She stands in the middle of tens of cholera patients, on the dirt in the backyard of the main hospital. Cholera has overwhelmed this border town of about 40,000 like wildfire.

More than 11,000 patients seen by MSF

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