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A camp for Rohingya. After many days of rain it's been flooded. Image shows many people trying to walk through waist-deep water.
October 10, 2017

“Right now, there are hundreds of thousands of people crammed along a narrow peninsula trying to find what shelter they can. It’s essentially a massive rural slum – and one of the worst slums imaginable. There are hardly any latrines so people have tried to rig up their own plastic sheeting around four bamboo poles, but there’s nowhere for their waste to go except into the stream below. That’s the same stream that just 10 meters away, others are using to collect drinking water. This has all the makings of a public health emergency. Some people are using clothes that they’ve strung together to provide shelter from the elements. But after two days of torrential rain and tropical thunderstorms, some communities’ shelter and few belongings have completely washed away. It’s a horrific situation and you see the devastation and the absolute lack of any comfort whatsoever. I can only imagine how incredibly terrible it must have been in their home village, if this is what they chose. If this is the better option, the other must have been a living hell.

September 21, 2017

A massive scale-up of humanitarian aid in Bangladesh is needed to avoid a massive public health disaster following the arrival of hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees, says the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).

September 06, 2017

Rohingya refugees fleeing to Bangladesh are in urgent need of medical and humanitarian assistance as an already dire humanitarian situation along the border with Myanmar worsens, says the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).

June 20, 2017

Part of the reason the Refugee Convention was drafted was in response to the extreme suffering to which people fleeing violence and persecution are often exposed. In order to protect refugees, the convention sought to establish their rights and to outline the obligations that states have to protect them. But in 2017, while the global legal consensus on the rights of refugees remains intact, the humanitarian spirit that led to the convention appears to be in short supply.

January 12, 2017

Every year, hundreds of Canadians work overseas with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), delivering front-line medical care as part of MSF’s lifesaving emergency programs. We aim to introduce you to some of them, such as Trish Newport, a longtime project coordinator who recently returned from working with Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

August 05, 2016

On Dr. Rogy Masri’s last day in Lebanon, staff in four Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) clinics in Tripoli ate cakes that had been decorated with an edible photo of his smiling, bearded face to bid him farewell — a testimony to the Toronto-based physician’s popularity with local colleagues. “They knew I have a really sweet tooth,” Dr. Masri chuckles. “I ate a lot of cake during my six-month assignment.”

August 20, 2015

The last few weeks have brought unprecedented high temperatures to much of the Middle East. In Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley, home to at least 410,000 refugees, temperatures have reached as high as 42 degrees. The heat isn’t just bringing discomfort; it’s bringing sickness.

April 17, 2015

Over one million Syrians have sought to escape a brutal armed conflict in their home country by fleeing to Lebanon, often becoming impoverished in the process and living in crowded, makeshift shelters. Add trying to survive with diabetes to those circumstances, and the situation for many becomes tragic. James Elliott is a Canadian researcher who recently returned from Lebanon, where he worked with diabetes patients among the Syrian refugee population.

August 29, 2013

Violent sectarian clashes between residents of two of Lebanon’s most deprived districts are leaving ordinary people caught in the crossfire as they struggle to access healthcare and get on with their daily lives. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are providing medical services to people on both sides of the frontline.

August 07, 2013

“I was seven months pregnant when I came to Lebanon,” said Maryam, 18, a Syrian refugee from Aleppo. “Many of my relatives were killed back home. I was terrified. I had to walk for hours before crossing the Lebanese border and suffered a hemorrhage. I feared miscarriage.”

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