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March 07, 2016

A new report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) uncovers the gaps in services and systems trapping women and children in cycles of severe family and sexual violence in Papua New Guinea.

May 13, 2014
“My 10-year-old daughter decided to follow me when I visited a friend at the hospital. She managed to escape from my sister’s and got on a bus. But she never found me. Instead I got a call from the police: she had been taken by a stranger and raped. I could not stop crying. What had ruined my life when I was 21 had now happened to my child too.”
 

Papua New Guinea (PNG) has some of the worst health statistics in the Pacific region and also has one of the world’s highest rates of sexual violence. About two percent of adults have HIV, and in some communities the rate of infection is much higher. AIDS has become a significant health issue.

In 2008, MSF welcomed support from 80,000 individual Canadians who contributed directly to our efforts to bring life-saving medical care to those in need. In our annual report for 2008, you will find information on MSF projects funded thanks to this generous support, through detailed descriptions of our programs as well as our audited financial statements. As well, our general director and president share some of MSF’s biggest challenges and accomplishments from the past year.

Papua New Guinea's Angau Hospital in Morobe Province is on high alert and treating people affected by an already deadly outbreak of cholera. As of Sept. 3, 95 cases of cholera were confirmed – including nine deaths – in Wasu, Morobe Province. This is a relatively worrying number as the small community of Wasu has a population of about 12,000. Cholera has also spread to Lae City.

For the first time in 50 years, a cholera outbreak is affecting Papua New Guinea. Mainly concentrated in the eastern Morobe province, the disease has so far infected 283 people according to official figures.

At the end of the twentieth century, it was thought that tuberculosis was on its way to being eradicated around the world., But the disease coming back with a vengeance. From Swaziland to Kyrgyzstan MSF teams are fighting its resurgence.

Following violent confrontations between armed forces and protesters in the streets of Kyrgyzstan’s capital on April 7, hundreds of wounded arrived in Bishkek hospitals.

The violent clashes that plunged the south of Kyrgyzstan into chaos since June 10 have led to an acute humanitarian crisis, with hundreds of people wounded and many people displaced from their homes. According to official reports, at least 170 people have been killed and 1,700 wounded during the past five days. MSF teams are arriving on the ground on both sides of the border between Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan to provide emergency assistance to those in need. In Kyrgyzstan, MSF’s emergency medical stock in the city of Osh has already been dispatched to local hospitals.

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