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October 24, 2014

Following a high level meeting on access and funding for Ebola vaccines convened yesterday by World Health Organization (WHO), Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) has urged that plans to get forthcoming Ebola vaccines and treatments to frontline workers must be rapidly implemented. Significant investment and incentives are needed now to accelerate these steps.

The medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is shocked by the judgment rendered by Switzerland's highest judicial body, the Federal Tribunal. Following four years of proceedings, and in spite of two previous rulings in favour of MSF, the Federal Tribunal partly ruled in favour of the Dutch state by ruling that the financial burden should be shared between the two parties. This decision sets a grave precedent for independent humanitarian action in zones of conflict.

The Executive Board of UNITAID, the international health financing agency, will meet Dec. 14-15 in Geneva to decide on the future direction of the Patent Pool for AIDS medicines. International medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is concerned that a number of pharmaceutical companies are seeking to exclude developing countries categorized as ‘middle-income’ from benefiting from medicines made under licence from the Pool.  If these companies are successful, people living with HIV/AIDS will be made to pay the price.

In a decisive step to improve access to medicines in the developing world, the Executive Board of UNITAID, the international health financing agency, has given the green light for a patent pool for HIV/AIDS medicines to open for business. “Although these are early days, the patent pool could become a mechanism that systematically offers licenses to generic manufacturers, reducing prices and facilitating the combination of drugs from different makers into fixed-dose or one pill combinations,” said Dr.

At the end of the twentieth century, it was thought that tuberculosis was on its way to being eradicated around the world., But the disease coming back with a vengeance. From Swaziland to Kyrgyzstan MSF teams are fighting its resurgence.

Following violent confrontations between armed forces and protesters in the streets of Kyrgyzstan’s capital on April 7, hundreds of wounded arrived in Bishkek hospitals.

The violent clashes that plunged the south of Kyrgyzstan into chaos since June 10 have led to an acute humanitarian crisis, with hundreds of people wounded and many people displaced from their homes. According to official reports, at least 170 people have been killed and 1,700 wounded during the past five days. MSF teams are arriving on the ground on both sides of the border between Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan to provide emergency assistance to those in need. In Kyrgyzstan, MSF’s emergency medical stock in the city of Osh has already been dispatched to local hospitals.

A week after massive and violent inter-ethnic clashes erupted in the south of Kyrgyzstan, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are providing medical care and assistance to the victims. The medical humanitarian organization plans to rapidly increase the level of its aid efforts, with more humanitarian workers dispatched to the field and with tonnes of medical and logistic material for the displaced being flown in from Europe.

The situation is still very tense in Osh and Jalalabad, southern Kyrgyzstan, where violent clashes have left hundreds dead since June 10. MSF teams are providing medical care to the survivors and to people displaced by the violence, and are also supporting local health structures.

MSF calls for impartial access to healthcare

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