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July 15, 2013

In Mozambique, more than one in ten people are living with HIV/AIDS. Many of them suffer from opportunistic infections like Kaposi’s sarcoma, a cancer that causes painful and disfiguring skin lesions. Kaposi’s sufferers are frequently stigmatized by the obvious lesions.

Around 136,000 people have been displaced, due to the floods that hit the provinces neighbouring the Zambesi River about a month ago. Though the initial response has allowed for cautious optimism, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) notes that the situation of the flood victims in the Zambesia Province is far from satisfactory : health risks remain high.

Major floods devastate the Zambeze basin, the main river in Mozambique. MSF brings first aid to populations displaced by these floods, providing basic sanitation and hygiene conditions, as well as monitoring the presence of related diseases such as cholera.

New MSF report "Help Wanted : Confronting the health care worker crisis to expand access to HIV/AIDS treatment"

In 2008, MSF welcomed support from 80,000 individual Canadians who contributed directly to our efforts to bring life-saving medical care to those in need. In our annual report for 2008, you will find information on MSF projects funded thanks to this generous support, through detailed descriptions of our programs as well as our audited financial statements. As well, our general director and president share some of MSF’s biggest challenges and accomplishments from the past year.

At the end of the twentieth century, it was thought that tuberculosis was on its way to being eradicated around the world., But the disease coming back with a vengeance. From Swaziland to Kyrgyzstan MSF teams are fighting its resurgence.

Following violent confrontations between armed forces and protesters in the streets of Kyrgyzstan’s capital on April 7, hundreds of wounded arrived in Bishkek hospitals.

The violent clashes that plunged the south of Kyrgyzstan into chaos since June 10 have led to an acute humanitarian crisis, with hundreds of people wounded and many people displaced from their homes. According to official reports, at least 170 people have been killed and 1,700 wounded during the past five days. MSF teams are arriving on the ground on both sides of the border between Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan to provide emergency assistance to those in need. In Kyrgyzstan, MSF’s emergency medical stock in the city of Osh has already been dispatched to local hospitals.

A week after massive and violent inter-ethnic clashes erupted in the south of Kyrgyzstan, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are providing medical care and assistance to the victims. The medical humanitarian organization plans to rapidly increase the level of its aid efforts, with more humanitarian workers dispatched to the field and with tonnes of medical and logistic material for the displaced being flown in from Europe.

The situation is still very tense in Osh and Jalalabad, southern Kyrgyzstan, where violent clashes have left hundreds dead since June 10. MSF teams are providing medical care to the survivors and to people displaced by the violence, and are also supporting local health structures.

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