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August 17, 2015

In Tumaco, Nariño Department, Colombia, Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) has responded to an increase in Chikungunya, a viral disease that causes fever and severe joint pain and is transmitted to humans by infected mosquitoes.

July 09, 2015

Displacements, restrictions on mobility and lack of access to basic goods and services such as healthcare: These are the main consequences of the escalation of the conflict in southwestern Colombia, which is causing a growing humanitarian crisis.

By Simon Midgley. Uraba Project, Colombia

The Thai government should halt all forced repatriation proceedings against the 7,500 ethnic Hmong refugees from Laos who are currently confined to a camp in northern Thailand's Petchabun province. This is the call today from the international medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF). The refugees, who claim to have fled violence and persecution in Laos, are deeply fearful of being returned to their country.

After months of work and negotiations with armed groups, MSF has managed to access the Bajo Atrato region in Choco, Colombia. During the week of November 5, an MSF mobile clinic visited several communities isolated by the conflict along the river corridor of Truando, south of Riosucio, the municipal capital. The team offered vaccinations for hundreds of children under five and medical attention for the general population.

“Many people leave for Florencia yet if even then they feel threatened, they flee to Bogotá or further away”, says Serge Le Duc, MSF coordinator who has just returned from Caquetá, Colombia.

“People sometimes look for someone to listen to them and other times to help them make a decision” - Interview with Dr. Alessandro Huber, MSF psychiatrist, who has worked for two years in Caquetá, Colombia

Médecins Sans Frontières calls again for immediate halt of forced repatriations and access to the deported Hmong for medical assistance

The rate of sexual violence in Colombia is alarming. A recent study carried out by the international humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) reveals that 35% of their mobile clinic patients and 22% of patients in their fixed clinics have suffered an episode of sexual violence at least once in their lives. A victim of sexual violence needs comprehensive health services including medical and psychological care.

Weak, dehydrated and traumatized, the Rohingya people stepping off the boats that make it to Thailand’s shores tells an alarming story. This is a story that begins across the Andaman Sea, the sea that the Rohingya risk their lives to cross, in the western most state of Myanmar. Here, the Rohingya, a minority Muslim ethnic group, have suffered decades of restriction and indignity that has led countless people to flee across the border to neighbouring Bangladesh and further afield.

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