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June 03, 2016

Following an outbreak of yellow fever in Angola this past December and the subsequent confirmation of dozens of cases in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are providing support in both countries to help contain the spread of the disease.

August 17, 2015

In Tumaco, Nariño Department, Colombia, Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) has responded to an increase in Chikungunya, a viral disease that causes fever and severe joint pain and is transmitted to humans by infected mosquitoes.

July 09, 2015

Displacements, restrictions on mobility and lack of access to basic goods and services such as healthcare: These are the main consequences of the escalation of the conflict in southwestern Colombia, which is causing a growing humanitarian crisis.

MSF calls for health groups to get more involved

By Simon Midgley. Uraba Project, Colombia

Zoe grew up and was educated in London and has worked both in the UK and abroad for a number of humanitarian organisations including Oxfam, Interact, and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). She is a water and sanitation expert with significant field experience in Rwanda, Kenya, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan and Angola. In 2005, Zoe worked in Uige, Angola following an outbreak of deadly Marburg disease, which is a haemorrhagic fever similar to Ebola.

After months of work and negotiations with armed groups, MSF has managed to access the Bajo Atrato region in Choco, Colombia. During the week of November 5, an MSF mobile clinic visited several communities isolated by the conflict along the river corridor of Truando, south of Riosucio, the municipal capital. The team offered vaccinations for hundreds of children under five and medical attention for the general population.

The international medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) denounces the pervasive and systematic use of rape and violence committed by the Angolan army during the expulsions of Congolese migrants working in diamond mines in the Angolan province of Lunda Norte. MSF teams arrived in Western Kasai — a Congolese province bordering Angola — in October 2007 and are providing care there to victims of sexual violence. They have also collected 100 testimonies exposing collective rape and physical abuse widely perpetrated by the Angolan military.

“Many people leave for Florencia yet if even then they feel threatened, they flee to Bogotá or further away”, says Serge Le Duc, MSF coordinator who has just returned from Caquetá, Colombia.

“People sometimes look for someone to listen to them and other times to help them make a decision” - Interview with Dr. Alessandro Huber, MSF psychiatrist, who has worked for two years in Caquetá, Colombia

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