Previous
Next

Country/Region

March 20, 2017

Nicholas Gildersleeve is a Canadian from Frelighsburg, Quebec, who until recently served as Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s head of mission in Bolivia — a country with the world’s highest incidence of Chagas, which is endemic in 60 per cent of its territory. The disease, which is found almost exclusively in Latin America and is transmitted by triatomine insects (also known as “kissing bugs”), is mostly asymptomatic for the first years of infection, but will often eventually result in debilitating complications that can shorten life expectancy by an average of 10 years. Heart complications are the most common cause of death in infected adults.

April 14, 2015

Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is launching a new project to ensure that people can be diagnosed and treated for Chagas disease in the town of Monteagudo, in the Chuquisaca department of southern Bolivia. In partnership with local healthcare institutions, the organization will develop a comprehensive care model for primary and secondary care that will be integrated into the existing healthcare system.

At the end of the twentieth century, it was thought that tuberculosis was on its way to being eradicated around the world., But the disease coming back with a vengeance. From Swaziland to Kyrgyzstan MSF teams are fighting its resurgence.

Following violent confrontations between armed forces and protesters in the streets of Kyrgyzstan’s capital on April 7, hundreds of wounded arrived in Bishkek hospitals.

The violent clashes that plunged the south of Kyrgyzstan into chaos since June 10 have led to an acute humanitarian crisis, with hundreds of people wounded and many people displaced from their homes. According to official reports, at least 170 people have been killed and 1,700 wounded during the past five days. MSF teams are arriving on the ground on both sides of the border between Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan to provide emergency assistance to those in need. In Kyrgyzstan, MSF’s emergency medical stock in the city of Osh has already been dispatched to local hospitals.

A week after massive and violent inter-ethnic clashes erupted in the south of Kyrgyzstan, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are providing medical care and assistance to the victims. The medical humanitarian organization plans to rapidly increase the level of its aid efforts, with more humanitarian workers dispatched to the field and with tonnes of medical and logistic material for the displaced being flown in from Europe.

The situation is still very tense in Osh and Jalalabad, southern Kyrgyzstan, where violent clashes have left hundreds dead since June 10. MSF teams are providing medical care to the survivors and to people displaced by the violence, and are also supporting local health structures.

MSF calls for impartial access to healthcare

In the "Month in Focus - July 2010" edition: Haiti - Six months on; Malnutrition - hundreds of thousands of children under threat; Kyrgyzstan - tension remains high