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March 20, 2017

Nicholas Gildersleeve is a Canadian from Frelighsburg, Quebec, who until recently served as Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s head of mission in Bolivia — a country with the world’s highest incidence of Chagas, which is endemic in 60 per cent of its territory. The disease, which is found almost exclusively in Latin America and is transmitted by triatomine insects (also known as “kissing bugs”), is mostly asymptomatic for the first years of infection, but will often eventually result in debilitating complications that can shorten life expectancy by an average of 10 years. Heart complications are the most common cause of death in infected adults.

July 20, 2015

The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) applauds the results of the Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment (START) trial, released today at the International AIDS Society Conference (IAS) in Vancouver, showing that immediate treatment is beneficial for the individual regardless of the status of his or her immune system.

April 14, 2015

Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is launching a new project to ensure that people can be diagnosed and treated for Chagas disease in the town of Monteagudo, in the Chuquisaca department of southern Bolivia. In partnership with local healthcare institutions, the organization will develop a comprehensive care model for primary and secondary care that will be integrated into the existing healthcare system.

October 24, 2013

Since February 2013, an innovative approach, commonly referred to as PMTCT B+ (prevention of mother-to-child transmission, option B+), is being rolled out by Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) and the Ministry of Health in the Nhlangano area, in the south of the country. It aims to place 2,000 HIV-positive pregnant women on treatment over the next four years, as soon as possible after their diagnosis. So far, more than 200 women have joined the programme.

September 17, 2013

An innovative approach to preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS is being rolled out by Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and the Ministry of Health in the Nhlangano area of southern Swaziland. It will place 2,000 HIV-positive pregnant women on treatment over the next four years, as soon as possible after their diagnosis. So far, more than 200 women have joined the program.

August 08, 2013

“I feel like jumping and dancing and shouting,” said Linda Vilakati. “It has been a long and difficult journey, but I’ve reached the end.”

MSF and Swaziland discuss public health response and finding practical solutions

Lindo, a little girl living in the Kingdom of Swaziland, has had to endure daily injections of the MDR TB treatment drug for the past four months.

At the end of the twentieth century, it was thought that tuberculosis was on its way to being eradicated around the world., But the disease coming back with a vengeance. From Swaziland to Kyrgyzstan MSF teams are fighting its resurgence.

Uninterrupted ARV drug supply crucial to survival

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