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March 20, 2017

Nicholas Gildersleeve is a Canadian from Frelighsburg, Quebec, who until recently served as Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s head of mission in Bolivia — a country with the world’s highest incidence of Chagas, which is endemic in 60 per cent of its territory. The disease, which is found almost exclusively in Latin America and is transmitted by triatomine insects (also known as “kissing bugs”), is mostly asymptomatic for the first years of infection, but will often eventually result in debilitating complications that can shorten life expectancy by an average of 10 years. Heart complications are the most common cause of death in infected adults.

July 18, 2016

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is calling on global HIV/AIDS leaders at the International AIDS Conference in Durban to develop and implement an action plan to address the critical lack of access to HIV treatment in those countries in West and Central Africa where coverage remains below 30 percent. This comes as new MSF data from Southern Africa suggests that the implementation of “Test and Start” is feasible but that community-led outreach is necessary to test and link people living with HIV to care and support them on lifelong treatment.

December 01, 2015

Imagine trying to keep a life-or-death secret when it touches almost everyone you know. The statistics tell you that many people with whom you live, work or socialize share the same secret. Indeed, everyone you know has a parent, child, friend, colleague or neighbour who shares this secret. Yet you can never be sure who to confide in.

April 14, 2015

Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is launching a new project to ensure that people can be diagnosed and treated for Chagas disease in the town of Monteagudo, in the Chuquisaca department of southern Bolivia. In partnership with local healthcare institutions, the organization will develop a comprehensive care model for primary and secondary care that will be integrated into the existing healthcare system.

New MSF report "Help Wanted : Confronting the health care worker crisis to expand access to HIV/AIDS treatment"

In December 2007 MSF began providing essential healthcare to Zimbabwean migrants in the South African border town of Musina and in central Johannesburg. It is estimated that there are more than one million Zimbabwean migrants in South Africa.

In response to recent outbreaks of violence in Johannesburg, South Africa, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is currently providing emergency medical care for wounded people seeking shelter in police stations, community halls, and other locations where they have fled for safety. The violence, which is being aimed primarily at foreign nationals from neighbouring countries, first erupted in Alexandra township on May 11, and has since spread to several other townships, reaching central Johannesburg this past weekend.

Nearly three weeks after the first outbreak of violence against foreign nationals in Johannesburg, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) continues to provide medical assistance to displaced people throughout the city. MSF has also launched new activities in response to the unrest in Cape Town last week. The violence, which first erupted in Alexandra township on May 11, quickly spread throughout Johannesburg and to other parts of South Africa, including Western Cape Province. According to UNHCR, approximately 100,000 people have been displaced.

MSF alarmed by lack of protection of foreign nationals affected by recent violence

The international medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) today expressed alarm at the deportation of approximately 500 Zimbabweans, including women and children, from a detention centre in the South African city of Musina, on the border with Zimbabwe.  South African authorities in Musina told MSF that they had increased patrols along the border during the election run-off in Zimbabwe.

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