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March 20, 2017

Nicholas Gildersleeve is a Canadian from Frelighsburg, Quebec, who until recently served as Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s head of mission in Bolivia — a country with the world’s highest incidence of Chagas, which is endemic in 60 per cent of its territory. The disease, which is found almost exclusively in Latin America and is transmitted by triatomine insects (also known as “kissing bugs”), is mostly asymptomatic for the first years of infection, but will often eventually result in debilitating complications that can shorten life expectancy by an average of 10 years. Heart complications are the most common cause of death in infected adults.

April 14, 2015

Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is launching a new project to ensure that people can be diagnosed and treated for Chagas disease in the town of Monteagudo, in the Chuquisaca department of southern Bolivia. In partnership with local healthcare institutions, the organization will develop a comprehensive care model for primary and secondary care that will be integrated into the existing healthcare system.

July 15, 2013

In Mozambique, more than one in ten people are living with HIV/AIDS. Many of them suffer from opportunistic infections like Kaposi’s sarcoma, a cancer that causes painful and disfiguring skin lesions. Kaposi’s sufferers are frequently stigmatized by the obvious lesions.

Around 136,000 people have been displaced, due to the floods that hit the provinces neighbouring the Zambesi River about a month ago. Though the initial response has allowed for cautious optimism, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) notes that the situation of the flood victims in the Zambesia Province is far from satisfactory : health risks remain high.

Major floods devastate the Zambeze basin, the main river in Mozambique. MSF brings first aid to populations displaced by these floods, providing basic sanitation and hygiene conditions, as well as monitoring the presence of related diseases such as cholera.

New MSF report "Help Wanted : Confronting the health care worker crisis to expand access to HIV/AIDS treatment"

In 2008, MSF welcomed support from 80,000 individual Canadians who contributed directly to our efforts to bring life-saving medical care to those in need. In our annual report for 2008, you will find information on MSF projects funded thanks to this generous support, through detailed descriptions of our programs as well as our audited financial statements. As well, our general director and president share some of MSF’s biggest challenges and accomplishments from the past year.

In northern Mozambique, MSF is empowering HIV-patients to take an active part in managing their disease.

Teams seeing 700 patients a day