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May 06, 2016

The largest cholera vaccination campaign ever undertaken has just commenced in Zambia’s capital, Lusaka. Over half a million people are expected to receive the oral cholera vaccine in an effort to curb an outbreak that began in February in the city’s overcrowded township areas. As of April 7, a total of 664 cases and 12 deaths had been reported in Lusaka.

April 12, 2013

Some 70,000 refugees from Mali are living in difficult conditions in the middle of the Mauritanian desert, with ethnic tensions in northern Mali quashing any hopes of a swift return home. A report released today by Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), called Stranded in the desert, calls on aid organizations to urgently renew efforts to meet the refugees’ basic needs.

In Lusaka, the capital city of Zambia, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is responding to the worst cholera outbreaks in the country for many years. Over the last five weeks the number of cholera cases has risen dramatically to more than 4,500, while more than 120 people have lost their lives. Despite hopes that the outbreak has reached its peak the previous week and that the number of cholera cases will start decreasing, heavy rains that continue to cause severe floods in the city could potentially worsen the situation in the coming weeks.

MSF providing medical and nutritional assistance for refugees and local people

57,000 people sharing 100 latrines

Screening and treatment dealt with chronic needs

Measles threatens children’s lives

All parties to the conflict in Mali must avoid harming civilians and health structures, the international medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) announced today. Civilians have been affected by armed conflict over the last few days in Konna and by bombings in Lere and Douentza, a town in the northeast of Mali's Mopti region. An MSF medical team is supporting medical activities in a hospital in Douentza.

Conflict in the north of Mali is still causing mass movements of people across the Sahel region of Africa and the conditions in the camps where they are living are unacceptable, leading to disease and suffering. According to UNHCR, approximately 150,000 refugees are living in refugee camps located in Burkina Faso (Ferrerio, Dibissi, Ngatourou-niénié and Gandafabou camps), Mauritania (Mbera camp) and Niger (Abala, Mangaize, and Ayorou camps).