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June 07, 2013

Imagine you are nine months pregnant and ready to give birth. You feel your contractions start. You are excited and afraid, but mostly you are in pain and praying that everything will go well.

New MSF report "Help Wanted : Confronting the health care worker crisis to expand access to HIV/AIDS treatment"

Tuberculosis (TB) kills two million people and infects nine million every year, and those numbers are rising, especially in southern Africa, which has the highest rates of HIV. TB-HIV co-infection is already a major problem and it is only getting worse, in part because of a lack of effective diagnostic tools and treatments. Dr. Peter Saranchuk was the medical coordinator at MSF’s HIV/AIDS project in Lesotho. Here, he explains the reasons behind the dangerous relationship between TB and HIV.

At the end of the twentieth century, it was thought that tuberculosis was on its way to being eradicated around the world., But the disease coming back with a vengeance. From Swaziland to Kyrgyzstan MSF teams are fighting its resurgence.

Following violent confrontations between armed forces and protesters in the streets of Kyrgyzstan’s capital on April 7, hundreds of wounded arrived in Bishkek hospitals.

The violent clashes that plunged the south of Kyrgyzstan into chaos since June 10 have led to an acute humanitarian crisis, with hundreds of people wounded and many people displaced from their homes. According to official reports, at least 170 people have been killed and 1,700 wounded during the past five days. MSF teams are arriving on the ground on both sides of the border between Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan to provide emergency assistance to those in need. In Kyrgyzstan, MSF’s emergency medical stock in the city of Osh has already been dispatched to local hospitals.

A week after massive and violent inter-ethnic clashes erupted in the south of Kyrgyzstan, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are providing medical care and assistance to the victims. The medical humanitarian organization plans to rapidly increase the level of its aid efforts, with more humanitarian workers dispatched to the field and with tonnes of medical and logistic material for the displaced being flown in from Europe.

The situation is still very tense in Osh and Jalalabad, southern Kyrgyzstan, where violent clashes have left hundreds dead since June 10. MSF teams are providing medical care to the survivors and to people displaced by the violence, and are also supporting local health structures.

Short-sighted savings measures ignore latest science, will cost more lives

MSF calls for impartial access to healthcare

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