Previous
Next

Country/Region

September 26, 2016

Pat Gould and Kim Letson are not ones to shy away from a challenge, and this fall they’ve decided to take on yet another. From September to October, the two friends from the Comox Valley in British Columbia will be walking through three countries along the 1,000-kilometre Via Egnatia route in southeastern Europe to raise funds for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s annual Walk Without Borders challenge.

June 03, 2016

Following an outbreak of yellow fever in Angola this past December and the subsequent confirmation of dozens of cases in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are providing support in both countries to help contain the spread of the disease.

May 05, 2016

Last year, 75 hospitals managed or supported by international medical organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) were bombed. This was in violation of the most fundamental rules of war which gives protected status to medical facilities and its patients, regardless if the patients are civilians or wounded combatants. Beyond the hospitals, civilians are being wounded and killed by indiscriminate warfare in Syria, Yemen, South Sudan, Afghanistan and elsewhere. At the same time, the treatment of refugees and migrants in Europe and beyond has shown a shocking lack of humanity. A humanitarian summit, at which states, UN agencies and non-governmental organisations come together to discuss these urgent issues, has never been more needed. So the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) this month could have been a perfect opportunity.

MSF calls for health groups to get more involved

Zoe grew up and was educated in London and has worked both in the UK and abroad for a number of humanitarian organisations including Oxfam, Interact, and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). She is a water and sanitation expert with significant field experience in Rwanda, Kenya, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan and Angola. In 2005, Zoe worked in Uige, Angola following an outbreak of deadly Marburg disease, which is a haemorrhagic fever similar to Ebola.

The international medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) denounces the pervasive and systematic use of rape and violence committed by the Angolan army during the expulsions of Congolese migrants working in diamond mines in the Angolan province of Lunda Norte. MSF teams arrived in Western Kasai — a Congolese province bordering Angola — in October 2007 and are providing care there to victims of sexual violence. They have also collected 100 testimonies exposing collective rape and physical abuse widely perpetrated by the Angolan military.

Since May 26, more than 30,000 Congolese expelled from Angola have crossed the border at Kahungula, Bandundu province, in the southwest of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In response to an alert sounded by the Congolese authorities, MSF went to the area to provide healthcare and to assess the situation of the expelled people. MSF offered medical assistance to the 600 to 700 Congolese being expelled daily and collected their testimonies.

Thousands of displaced people have been streaming into the Ariwara area, near Aru, in the northeast of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) for several weeks. They’ve been fleeing other parts of neighbouring Haut-Uélé where the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) has continued its attacks. MSF project coordinator Patrick Robitaille bears witness to the MSF’s team’s concerns about chronic insecurity and the resulting malnutrition and sanitation problems.

Staff working with local aid groups

Health system responding to medical needs

Pages