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June 03, 2016

Following an outbreak of yellow fever in Angola this past December and the subsequent confirmation of dozens of cases in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are providing support in both countries to help contain the spread of the disease.

December 01, 2015

A newly released study by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) stresses the need for continuous support to HIV-positive people under antiretroviral therapy (ART), including at hospital level.

July 20, 2015

The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) warned today that not enough is being done to ensure that people with HIV/AIDS who are on antiretroviral treatment (ART) reach and maintain “undetectable” levels of virus in their blood.

July 18, 2014

From July 20 to 25, the international community will gather at the International AIDS conference in Melbourne, Australia, in order to explore strategies to beat the greatest pandemic of our times. HIV still kills 1.6 million people every year, most of them in poor countries of sub-Saharan Africa. In order to bring life-saving antiretroviral treatment (ART) to the nearly 16 million who still need it worldwide, it is crucial to alleviate one of the main barriers preventing them from accessing care: distance to the health centres where they can get these drugs.

MSF calls for health groups to get more involved

Zoe grew up and was educated in London and has worked both in the UK and abroad for a number of humanitarian organisations including Oxfam, Interact, and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). She is a water and sanitation expert with significant field experience in Rwanda, Kenya, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan and Angola. In 2005, Zoe worked in Uige, Angola following an outbreak of deadly Marburg disease, which is a haemorrhagic fever similar to Ebola.

The international medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) denounces the pervasive and systematic use of rape and violence committed by the Angolan army during the expulsions of Congolese migrants working in diamond mines in the Angolan province of Lunda Norte. MSF teams arrived in Western Kasai — a Congolese province bordering Angola — in October 2007 and are providing care there to victims of sexual violence. They have also collected 100 testimonies exposing collective rape and physical abuse widely perpetrated by the Angolan military.

In December 2007 MSF began providing essential healthcare to Zimbabwean migrants in the South African border town of Musina and in central Johannesburg. It is estimated that there are more than one million Zimbabwean migrants in South Africa.

Since May 26, more than 30,000 Congolese expelled from Angola have crossed the border at Kahungula, Bandundu province, in the southwest of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In response to an alert sounded by the Congolese authorities, MSF went to the area to provide healthcare and to assess the situation of the expelled people. MSF offered medical assistance to the 600 to 700 Congolese being expelled daily and collected their testimonies.

MSF reacts to cholera outbreak in Harare

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