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June 03, 2016

Following an outbreak of yellow fever in Angola this past December and the subsequent confirmation of dozens of cases in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are providing support in both countries to help contain the spread of the disease.

July 15, 2013

In Mozambique, more than one in ten people are living with HIV/AIDS. Many of them suffer from opportunistic infections like Kaposi’s sarcoma, a cancer that causes painful and disfiguring skin lesions. Kaposi’s sufferers are frequently stigmatized by the obvious lesions.

MSF calls for health groups to get more involved

Around 136,000 people have been displaced, due to the floods that hit the provinces neighbouring the Zambesi River about a month ago. Though the initial response has allowed for cautious optimism, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) notes that the situation of the flood victims in the Zambesia Province is far from satisfactory : health risks remain high.

Major floods devastate the Zambeze basin, the main river in Mozambique. MSF brings first aid to populations displaced by these floods, providing basic sanitation and hygiene conditions, as well as monitoring the presence of related diseases such as cholera.

New MSF report "Help Wanted : Confronting the health care worker crisis to expand access to HIV/AIDS treatment"

Zoe grew up and was educated in London and has worked both in the UK and abroad for a number of humanitarian organisations including Oxfam, Interact, and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). She is a water and sanitation expert with significant field experience in Rwanda, Kenya, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan and Angola. In 2005, Zoe worked in Uige, Angola following an outbreak of deadly Marburg disease, which is a haemorrhagic fever similar to Ebola.

The international medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) denounces the pervasive and systematic use of rape and violence committed by the Angolan army during the expulsions of Congolese migrants working in diamond mines in the Angolan province of Lunda Norte. MSF teams arrived in Western Kasai — a Congolese province bordering Angola — in October 2007 and are providing care there to victims of sexual violence. They have also collected 100 testimonies exposing collective rape and physical abuse widely perpetrated by the Angolan military.

Since May 26, more than 30,000 Congolese expelled from Angola have crossed the border at Kahungula, Bandundu province, in the southwest of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In response to an alert sounded by the Congolese authorities, MSF went to the area to provide healthcare and to assess the situation of the expelled people. MSF offered medical assistance to the 600 to 700 Congolese being expelled daily and collected their testimonies.

Thousands of displaced people have been streaming into the Ariwara area, near Aru, in the northeast of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) for several weeks. They’ve been fleeing other parts of neighbouring Haut-Uélé where the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) has continued its attacks. MSF project coordinator Patrick Robitaille bears witness to the MSF’s team’s concerns about chronic insecurity and the resulting malnutrition and sanitation problems.

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