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July 20, 2015

The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) applauds the results of the Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment (START) trial, released today at the International AIDS Society Conference (IAS) in Vancouver, showing that immediate treatment is beneficial for the individual regardless of the status of his or her immune system.

January 29, 2015

Three weeks later after Malawi was devastated by the largest floods in living memory, people are still struggling to get on with their lives. Some must also continue to plan for events that even floods can’t disrupt — like the arrival of a new baby. The following piece tells the story of Berita, an expectant mother who had to overcome unanticipated adversity to deliver her new baby.

January 16, 2015

* story updated below

Up to 20,000 people in the southern tip of Malawi most affected by the current floods remain cut off from the rest of the country, without food, health care or ways to prevent possible outbreaks, the humanitarian medical organization Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) said on Friday.

May 31, 2013

Near the end of the second community outreach clinic day, organized specifically for Commercial Sex Workers (CSW) in Nsanje, Malawi, Isabella, a shy young woman arrives. That day, she and two of her friends are tested for HIV and her test result is positive. Through counseling and encouragement to start antiretroviral (ARV) treatment, Isabella finally admits to the counselor that she already knew she was positive. She had missed two appointments at the hospital ARV treatment clinic and, after this, she had been too embarrassed to go back. Instead, she is taking pills from friends – honestly or dishonestly – to continue her medication. Scared, she came to our clinic looking for help.

New MSF report "Help Wanted : Confronting the health care worker crisis to expand access to HIV/AIDS treatment"

MSF program manager Filipe Ribero has conducted several evaluations at sites where displaced persons are living in Tbilisi and Gori.  In the field, there is a sharp contrast between a massive influx of international aid and limited opportunities — for now — to provide assistance. What is the current situation in Georgia?

Fighting has calmed in and around the breakaway region of South Ossetia, and the warring parties have reached a ceasefire agreement. The short, violent conflict has displaced a lot of people in Georgia, South Ossetia and the Northern Caucasus region of Russia. As of 20 August, MSF is still unable to access South Ossetia, the area where the conflict had broken out, in order to conduct an independent needs assessment and provide medical and humanitarian aid to the population if necessary.

An MSF emergency team based in Tbilisi has been able to gain access to the separatist province of South Ossetia and visit Tskhinvali Hospital. MSF, which already provides support to displaced people in Tbilisi, has offered to provide medical assistance in South Ossetia. On August 23 an MSF team was able to gain access to Tskhinvali in Southern Ossetia, visiting the republican hospital in this city where intense fighting broke out on August 7. The situation has been slowly returning to normal in the aftermath of the peace accord signed by Russia and Georgia.

In Tbilisi, MSF emergency teams are providing medical aid to those who have fled the fighting among Russians, Ossetians, and Georgians in South Ossetia. They are chiefly offering medical attention to people in shelters, some of them very elderly. Kalistine G. is having a hard time getting used to her new surroundings. This 82-year-old native of Georgia has been in Tbilisi for several days, where she has found refuge in an abandoned building that used to house the former Finance Ministry.

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