Dispatches is Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) Canada's official magazine. In it, we bring you stories and updates about MSF's lifesaving work, as seen through the eyes of our staff, our patients and our donors — and especially from the perspective of the many Canadians working on the ground with MSF around the world.

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Dispatches is published twice annually as a print and digital magazine, but new stories and articles from MSF Canada are continually added throughout the year online. Follow the links below to see our latest content.

Topic

February 10, 2017

Dr. Karthika Devarajan is an obstetrician at North York General Hospital in Toronto. She recently returned from Pakistan, where she helped run MSF's maternal health program in the country's north. "I cannot describe how powerful it was to know that each day really, truly meant something," she says. "I realized all over again what a gift my surgical training has been and I have a new appreciation for the immense freedom that has defined my own life."

January 12, 2017

Every year, hundreds of Canadians work overseas with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), delivering front-line medical care as part of MSF’s lifesaving emergency programs. We aim to introduce you to some of them, such as Trish Newport, a longtime project coordinator who recently returned from working with Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

January 06, 2017

Nurses and doctors with work experience in Canada’s north make ideal humanitarian aid workers, and are in high demand by the organization. “We see a definite positive relationship between the quality of the work done in the field and prior experience working in remote, northern communities.”

January 04, 2017

Dr. Bruce Lampard, who has worked overseas with MSF eight times since 2001, and his mother Diane McKenzie are longtime supporters, and both recently decided to leave gifts to MSF in their wills. “MSF has had such an impact on my life that the decision was pretty easy,” says Bruce.

December 19, 2016

Every December, we take the opportunity to not only look back on the past 12 months, but to find reasons for hope heading into the new year. It’s by no means an easy task, especially when focusing on Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s work on the front lines of humanitarian crises around the globe — which by its very nature can often highlight seemingly unending conflicts and growing needs.

December 09, 2016

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) supporters around the world were thrilled recently when pharmaceutical giant Pfizer announced that it was reducing the price of its pneumonia vaccine to US$3.10 per dose for humanitarian organizations working in emergency settings. A group of Canadian grandmothers played an active role in supporting the successful campaign, which will help protect the lives of millions of vulnerable children around the world.

November 21, 2016

In northeastern Nigeria, a humanitarian emergency is reaching catastrophic levels, and Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has called for a massive international relief effort to take place immediately. The desperate living conditions in Borno State show the devastating impact of the ongoing conflict between Boko Haram and the Nigerian military. In several locations, people have sought refuge in towns or camps controlled by the military, and are entirely reliant on outside aid that does not reach them.

November 21, 2016

I arrived in Bokoro, Chad, three months ago. It’s my first posting with [Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières] MSF, and I was so excited to finally get here. I have always wanted to work for MSF. This is my small contribution to make the world a better place. I knew Chad was going to be dry and hot and that there are very high levels of malnutrition here.

November 21, 2016

Zara Abba is in Bokoro from the capital of Chad, N’djamena. She has been at MSF’s intensive care unit in Bokoro town for four days, caring for her granddaughter, Katalma Moussa, who is two years old. Zara Abba was visiting Bokoro to pay her respects to a family member who'd died when her granddaughter fell ill.

“She hadn’t put much weight on for a while and then she started to get diarrhea and her health got even worse. I had been taking her out for walks and to play with the other children, but since she started getting diarrhea, she didn’t have any energy and I couldn’t do that anymore. She was always hungry and crying and it was like the milk we were giving her wasn’t enough. I looked after her for seven days at home but after that knew I had to get her to a clinic.”

November 21, 2016

This year, in villages across the Bokoro region, in partnership with the Ministry of Health (MoH), MSF is running 15 mobile outpatient clinics for malnourished children aged between six months and five years old. In Bokoro town, MSF has an Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Centre in an MoH Hospital, with an intensive care unit where the sickest children are referred. For the first time, MSF is also working in the area ahead of time in order to identify and try to prevent children at risk of malnutrition from falling ill.

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