December 21, 2016

Angie Bonvanie, a grade 6 teacher at Halton Hills Christian School in Georgetown, Ontario, strives to educate her students to make a difference and look beyond themselves. Together, they believe that “one person can do something, but together we can do so much more,” she says.

Last October, three Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) field projects were featured on the website of Kutoa, a philanthropic organization that highlights the work of different charities each month. Kutoa included MSF’s work under that month’s theme of “borderless healthcare,” and during those four weeks, Angie and her 11-year-old students watched videos, read articles and discussed the role MSF plays around the world.

“As Canadians, when we’re sick we just go to the doctors,” explains Angie. “We’re so fortunate to have that option. My students were really impacted by the realization that not everyone has access to healthcare.”

One of the most notable projects that month was MSF’s emergency response to an ongoing malnutrition crisis in Borno State, Nigeria. “My students were shocked by the fact that some children around the world don’t have anything – even food – while we have so much,” explains Angie.

Through Kutoa’s platform, each student participated by making a small contribution and then casting a vote for which MSF project they wanted the movement to support – something they agreed could have a big impact once combined. Angie concluded the project by highlighting that supporting MSF means more “people helping people.”

 

 

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